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I'm Adam Isacson. I live in Washington and work at the Washington Office on Latin America. I'm a dad, a husband, and I don't get enough sleep.

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"New South" my ass.
kohenari:

Mapping Racist Tweets in Response to President Obama’s Re-Election:

Yellow shading indicates states that have a relatively lower amount of  post-election hate tweets (compared to their overall tweeting patterns) and all states shaded in green have a higher amount.  The darker the green color the higher the location quotient measure for hate tweets.
Mississippi and Alabama have the highest LQ measures with scores of 7.4 and 8.1, respectively.
Other southern states (Georgia, Louisiana, Tennessee) surrounding these two core states also have very high LQ scores and form a fairly distinctive cluster in the southeast.
The prevalence of post-election racist tweets is not strictly a southern phenomenon as North Dakota (3.5), Utah (3.5) and Missouri (3) have very high LQs.  Other states such as West Virginia, Oregon and Minnesota don’t score as high but have a relatively higher number of hate tweets than their overall twitter usage would suggest.
The Northeast and West coast (with the exception of Oregon) have a relatively lower number of hate tweets.
States shaded in grey had no geocoded hate tweets within our database.  Many of these states (Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and South Dakota) have relatively low levels of Twitter use as well.  Rhode Island has much higher numbers of geocoded tweets but had no hate tweets that we could identify.
Keep in mind we are measuring tweets rather than users and so one individual could be responsible for many tweets and in some cases (most notably in  North Dakota, Utah and Minnesota) the number of hate tweets is small and the high LQ is driven by the relatively low number of overall tweets. Nonetheless, these findings support the idea that there are some fairly strong clustering of hate tweets centered in southeastern U.S. which has a much higher rate than the national average. 

Along with two excellent graduate students here at Nebraska, I’m at work on a project that takes a look at Twitter data to make a point or two about online racism and social network size. I’m looking forward to having attractive pictures that gets beyond this interesting (but well-known) point that racist Twitter users live largely where you’d expect them to live and instead focuses on who they think is listening to their racist tweets.
HT: Jake Wobig.

"New South" my ass.

kohenari:

Mapping Racist Tweets in Response to President Obama’s Re-Election:

Yellow shading indicates states that have a relatively lower amount of  post-election hate tweets (compared to their overall tweeting patterns) and all states shaded in green have a higher amount.  The darker the green color the higher the location quotient measure for hate tweets.

  • Mississippi and Alabama have the highest LQ measures with scores of 7.4 and 8.1, respectively.
  • Other southern states (Georgia, Louisiana, Tennessee) surrounding these two core states also have very high LQ scores and form a fairly distinctive cluster in the southeast.
  • The prevalence of post-election racist tweets is not strictly a southern phenomenon as North Dakota (3.5), Utah (3.5) and Missouri (3) have very high LQs.  Other states such as West Virginia, Oregon and Minnesota don’t score as high but have a relatively higher number of hate tweets than their overall twitter usage would suggest.
  • The Northeast and West coast (with the exception of Oregon) have a relatively lower number of hate tweets.
  • States shaded in grey had no geocoded hate tweets within our database.  Many of these states (Montana, Idaho, Wyoming and South Dakota) have relatively low levels of Twitter use as well.  Rhode Island has much higher numbers of geocoded tweets but had no hate tweets that we could identify.

Keep in mind we are measuring tweets rather than users and so one individual could be responsible for many tweets and in some cases (most notably in  North Dakota, Utah and Minnesota) the number of hate tweets is small and the high LQ is driven by the relatively low number of overall tweets. Nonetheless, these findings support the idea that there are some fairly strong clustering of hate tweets centered in southeastern U.S. which has a much higher rate than the national average. 

Along with two excellent graduate students here at Nebraska, I’m at work on a project that takes a look at Twitter data to make a point or two about online racism and social network size. I’m looking forward to having attractive pictures that gets beyond this interesting (but well-known) point that racist Twitter users live largely where you’d expect them to live and instead focuses on who they think is listening to their racist tweets.

HT: Jake Wobig.

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